That’s the Signpost Up Ahead. Your Next Stop…

Welcome to Retro Time.  In this blog, I’ll be covering topics related to film and television from past decades.  These won’t be reviews, but rather a selection of memories, thoughts, and ideas designed to spark a little nostalgia and maybe inspire a conversation or two.  Spoilers will likely come up, so please keep that in mind.  Thanks for stopping by, and if you have any thoughts or ideas, feel free to chime in.  I’d love to get your feedback.  Now, let’s get ready to take a look back…

The Twilight Zone

Lists seem to be all the rage these days so I figured it was high time that I chimed in with one of my own.  When looking for a subject to cover, the choice was obvious.  The Twilight Zone has always had a special place in my memory.  A local syndication channel used to play late night reruns when I was a kid and I can remember staying up on non-school nights to watch them. Often I was by myself, the lights turned down, watching as the opening images combined with Bernard Herrmann’s iconic theme to set the mood for the creepy tale to come.

For me, the zone was like the TV equivalent of a campfire ghost story. You know the kind, where a wily camp counselor or tale-spinning uncle sits there with a flashlight under his chin breaking out a bizarre yarn that you eat up right along with your horribly charred marshmallows. Maybe it was the bleakness of the black and white imagery combined with the lateness of the hour that made me feel that way. Whatever the case, these pieces of pure television gold will always shine a flashlight-sized spotlight on the dark corners of my TV-viewing memory.

So let’s get to it. This will not be a top five list. There are too many good ones for me to pick a top five. Instead, I’m just going with five random eps that I felt like talking about. Here they are in no particular order.  Continue reading

This Post Is For The Birds

Welcome to Retro Time.  In this blog, I’ll be covering topics related to film and television from past decades.  These won’t be reviews, but rather a selection of memories, thoughts, and ideas designed to spark a little nostalgia and maybe inspire a conversation or two.  Spoilers will likely come up, so please keep that in mind.  Thanks for stopping by, and if you have any thoughts or ideas, feel free to chime in.  I’d love to get your feedback.  Now, let’s get ready to take a look back…

The Birds

It’s summer, and there’s just something about this time of year that gets me in the mood to watch an old school monster movie.  I don’t know why.  Maybe it’s because I have fond memories of staying up to the wee hours during summer break, watching old creature features on late night TV when I was a kid.  I’m talking about stuff they made during the early Cold War era where the fear of nuclear bomb testing had everyone believing that a spider could grow to be as large as a house or a colony of ants could mutate into an army of rubber-skinned, horse-sized terrors.

But when I recently went to throw on one of these horrifying little gems of yesteryear, my mind settled on an interesting choice.

Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds. Continue reading

Graboids: The True Land Shark

Welcome to Retro Time.  In this blog, I’ll be covering topics related to film and television from past decades.  These won’t be reviews, but rather a selection of memories, thoughts, and ideas designed to spark a little nostalgia and maybe inspire a conversation or two.  Spoilers will likely come up, so please keep that in mind.  Thanks for stopping by, and if you have any thoughts or ideas, feel free to chime in.  I’d love to get your feedback.  Now, let’s get ready to take a look back…

Tremors

When Saturday Night Live first landed in 1975, one of their earliest sketches was a playoff of the popularity of Jaws that involved a zany reoccurring character called Land Shark.  Voiced by Chevy Chase, it would knock on its unassuming victim’s door and give some false identity to get them to open up.  Once they did, a foam rubber shark’s head would pop out from behind the door and bite down on the screaming victim to a reworked version of John William’s Jaws theme and the collective laughter of the audience.

I caught this sketch on a rerun recently and it got me thinking.  What big screen creature deserves the distinction of being the true Land Shark on film? Continue reading

An Alternate Interpretation of Star Trek: Generations

Welcome to Retro Time.  In this blog, I’ll be covering topics related to film and television from past decades.  These won’t be reviews, but rather a selection of memories, thoughts, and ideas designed to spark a little nostalgia and maybe inspire a conversation or two.  Spoilers will likely come up, so please keep that in mind.  Thanks for stopping by, and if you have any thoughts or ideas, feel free to chime in.  I’d love to get your feedback.  Now, let’s get ready to take a look back…

Star Trek: Generations

First, I’d like to start off by saying that I like Stark Trek: Generations for the most part.  Though far from perfect, I still find it entertaining and I feel that there’s a lot of good stuff there.  With that said, I can understand the criticism that many have with the film, especially the ending and its rather lackluster portrayal of Captain Kirk’s ultimate demise.

But what if I told you that there is one simple trick you can use that’ll make that whole falling to the rocks clinging to a rickety bridge thing go down much easier.  Impossible, you say?  I know it feels that way, but bear with me.

Like many of you, I’ve always felt that the falling bridge death was a rushed, unceremonious end for one of the most iconic figures in film and television history.  I mean, come on!  This is Kirk!  The man who beat up Kahn, saved the whales, and took on the whole Klingon Empire without hardly breaking a sweat.  He was supposed to die valiantly on the bridge of the Enterprise saving Earth from annihilation, not falling from a piece of scaffolding on some distant desert planet in the middle of nowhere.

So how can we possibly salvage this?  The answer is simple, and here it is. Continue reading